The 6 Best Books on Zero Waste

 

Zero Waste Home: The Ultimate Guide to Simplifying Your Life by Reducing Your Waste – Bea Johnson

“In Zero Waste Home, Bea Johnson shares the story of how she simplified her life by reducing her waste. Today, Bea, her husband, Scott, and their two young sons produce just one quart of garbage a year, and their overall quality of life has changed for the better: they now have more time together, they’ve cut their annual spending by a remarkable 40 percent, and they are healthier than they’ve ever been.”


 

Plastic-Free: How I Kicked the Plastic Habit and How You Can Too – Beth Terry

“Guides readers toward the road less consumptive, offering practical advice and moral support while making a convincing case that individual actions . . . do matter.” —Elizabeth Royte, author, Garbage Land and Bottlemania


 

The Zero-Waste Lifestyle: Live Well by Throwing Away Less – Amy Korst

A practical guide to generating less waste, featuring meaningful and achievable strategies from the blogger behind The Green Garbage Project, a yearlong experiment in living garbage-free.


 

Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money By Wasting Less Food – Dana Gunders

Despite a growing awareness of food waste, many well-intentioned home cooks lack the tools to change their habits. This handbook—packed with engaging checklists, simple recipes, practical strategies, and educational infographics—is the ultimate tool for reducing food waste.


 

The Joy of Less: A Minimalist Guide to Declutter, Organize, and Simplify – Francine Jay

Rather than the “crash diet” approach found in other tidying up books, Jay shares simple steps to cultivate a minimalist mindset and form new habits, paving the way to lasting success. Her easy-to-follow STREAMLINE method works in any space—from a single drawer to a closet, room, or entire house. What’s more, it can be called upon during clutter-inducing life events such as moving, getting married, having kids, or downsizing.


 

The Zero Waste Solution – Paul Connett

Waste is something we all make every day but often pay little attention to. That’s changing, and model programs around the globe show the many different ways a community can strive for, and achieve, zero-waste status.